POACHING & trafficking

prevention 

project category:

featured projects:

For most of our history, WD4C has used dogs’ exceptional abilities to find where and how cryptic, rare, or threatened species live. We are now putting our dogs to work finding and eliminating threats to these species. 

During our work monitoring lion, cheetah, and wild dogs in Zambia, we saw the victims of poaching firsthand: elephants shot for ivory, rhinos killed for their horns, and countless animals caught in vicious traps. We knew our dogs could help.

Our first target was the wire snares that have become epidemic throughout Africa. Skeptics told us that dogs couldn’t detect metal, but Pepin and Wicket didn’t get that memo: Not only can dogs find snares, they are 25% better at finding them than human searchers. And having dogs search for them frees scouts to remain vigilant for buffalo, elephant, and large carnivores.

We have now trained dogs to find guns, gunpowder and ammunition in addition to ivory, rhino horn, bushmeat, and pangolin scales. Their success in helping wildlife authorities find wildlife products, confiscate weapons, and arrest poachers has been immediate, and they’re having a big impact keeping protected areas safe for wildlife.

To keep African wildlife products from being trafficked around the world, we are currently placing conservation detection dogs with customs agents in Vietnam, Malawi, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Cambodia, and the United States.

For most of our history, WD4C has used dogs’ exceptional abilities to find where and how cryptic, rare, or threatened species live. We are now putting our dogs to work finding and eliminating threats to these species. 

During our work monitoring lion, cheetah, and wild dogs in Zambia, we saw the victims of poaching firsthand: elephants shot for ivory, rhinos killed for their horns, and countless animals caught in vicious traps. We knew our dogs could help. 

Our first target was the wire snares that have become epidemic throughout Africa. Skeptics told us that dogs couldn’t detect metal, but Pepin and Wicket didn’t get that memo: Not only can dogs find snares, they are 25% better at finding them than human searchers. And having dogs search for them frees scouts to remain vigilant for buffalo, elephant, and large carnivores.

We have now trained dogs to find guns, gunpowder and ammunition in addition to ivory, rhino horn, bushmeat, and pangolin scales. Their success in helping wildlife authorities find wildlife products, confiscate weapons, and arrest poachers has been immediate, and they’re having a big impact keeping protected areas safe for wildlife.

To keep African wildlife products from being trafficked around the world, we are currently placing conservation detection dogs with customs agents in Vietnam, Malawi, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Cambodia, and the United States.