ruger

ruger

Ruger started life as a feral dog, living by his wits on the Blackfeet Reservation in northern Montana. He was lucky enough to be adopted by a student at Carroll College’s Anthrozoology program, where students train rescue dogs as part of their coursework. She quickly realized that Ruger had the potential to be a great detection dog, and called us. Ruger was already going blind when he joined our pack, but it doesn’t slow him down one bit. He is the happiest dog around and is adored by all his handlers, though he can be touchy with strangers, especially because he can’t see them approach. He is methodical, steady and reliable in his detection work, and has turned out to be a terrific tracker, too, helping scouts and law enforcement follow the trail of evidence left by poachers.

 

Rue was given to WD4C by a concerned donor, who knew that the pup’s high energy and unbelievable drive to work put her at high risk for ending up at a shelter. Rue arrived on Christmas Eve, her crate decorated with green and red ribbons. At 13 weeks old, she was a tornado of speed and enthusiasm. Thirteen months later, work is her play. She would rather search than go to the dog park, and nothing thrills her more than the sight of her working vest. Even at her young age she can ignore distractions and maintain her focus over hours of searching. Rue is going to be a gift that keeps on giving.

© Edward Selfe

 

Ruger's blindness helps him focus his nose on detecting contraband and tracking poachers.